Additional Polio Clinics for 5-9 year olds

POP-UP POLIO VACCINATION CLINIC
Where? Lambeth Civic Centre SW2 1EG (3 minutes from Brixton station)
For who? All children aged 5-9
• 14th September – 16th September, 15.15 – 18.30
• 21st September – 23rd September, 15.15 – 18.30
• 24th September, 11.00 – 16.00
NO BOOKING NEEDED – JUST TURN UP AND WAIT YOUR TURN! To explore all available vaccination sites for Polio, please see here

Childhood vaccinations Q&A for parents

For parents of children getting their vaccinations can have their questions answered by London clinicians and UK Health Security Agency experts.

Join the Q&A session on Tuesday 13 September 2022 from 13:00 to 14:00. Find out more and register.

Bowel Cancer Screening

Your next poo could save your life

We are supporting a London-wide campaign to encourage more patients to do their free NHS bowel cancer screening home test, which checks if you could have bowel cancer.

People who are the right age are sent a free NHS FIT (Faecal Immunochemical Test) kit every two years. You use it to collect a small sample of poo and post it back to an NHS lab.

The campaign by NHS London, “Your next poo could save your life”, urges more people to use their kit – a message we wholeheartedly endorse.

Screening can help prevent bowel cancer and find it at an early stage when it’s easier to treat. People who complete their screening are 25% less likely to die of bowel cancer.

The kits are for people with no symptoms and most people get the all-clear.

If you are aged 56, 58 (on or after 16 May 2022) or 60 to 74 and we have your correct address, you will be sent a kit every 2 years. Please use it. By April 2025, bowel cancer screening kits will be for everyone aged 50 to 74 in England.

To find out more and hear from other Londoners about their experience of bowel cancer screening, visit www.healthylondon.org/bcs If you have symptoms of bowel cancer which last for three weeks or more, please contact the practice and ask for an appointment.

The Practice will close at 12.30pm on 7.9.22 for staff training

The Practice will close at 12.30pm on 7.9.2022 for staff training and it will reopen on 8.09.2022 at 8.00am.

For any URGENT reasons which cannot wait while we will be closed for training please call 020 8175 0143, and you will speak to a GP who will assess your problem and arrange appropriate care. For any non-urgent problems please visit our practice website and click on the online consultation link where your query will be dealt with when the practice re-opens.

In a medical emergency, please telephone 999 or for advice, telephone 111

If you have a prearranged appointment at The Well Centre, please enter the lobby and call the intercom for one of their staff members.

Thank you.

Herne Hill Group Practice

Polio Rise – Update

You may be aware that traces of the polio virus have been found in sewage in London Boroughs and the best way to protect children is to make sure they are fully up to date with their vaccinations.

A letter from NHS England went out to all parents/carers in the 32 London Boroughs with children aged between 1-9 late last week inviting them to receive a dose of vaccine against polio, for some this will be an additional dose, for others who are not up to date with their routine vaccinations it will be a catch-up dose. Those that should have recieved one of these letters can book in a polio vaccine now.

Below are all the Sites where these vaccines can be booked for, Akerman Medical Practice will operate on an invite basis only. Links below on how to book.

Guy’s Hospital

Great Maze Pond                                                  

SE1 9RT                                        

5–9-year-olds only

 

Nearest station: London Bridge

(3 minute walk)       

 

To book an appointment at Guy’s Hospital please use their online booking system.

 

If you have any difficulties using the online booking system, please contact the hospital via email: CovidVaccineBookings@gstt.nhs.uk

 

Kings Hospital

Denmark Hill

SE5 9RS

 

5–9-year-olds only

 

Nearest station: Denmark Hill

(3 minute walk) or Loughborough Junction (5 minute walk)

 

To book an appointment at Kings Hospital please call 0203 299 9405 or email:

kch-tr.vaccinebookings@nhs.net.

Akerman Medical Practice

60 Patmos Road

London

SW9 6AF

1–9-year-olds

 

Nearest station: Oval Station

(10 minute walk)

P5 bus stops outside the Health Centre

 

Clinic is operated on

Appointment Basis Only

 

Any queries: lgpf.lambethgpfederations@nhs.net

 

Polio Rise – News

You may have heard in the news there are signs Polio may be spreading in London and the number of children vaccinated in London is lower than it should be. Boosting immunity in children should help protect them and reduce the risk of the virus continuing to spread. Please see below for more information including a Q&A about Polio.

Extra polio vaccine dose for children in London

Children aged 1 to 9 years old in London are being offered a dose of polio vaccine. For some children this may be an extra dose on top of their routine vaccinations. In other children it may bring them up to date with their routine vaccinations.

Why is this happening now?

There are signs the virus may be spreading in London and the number of children vaccinated in London is lower than it should be. Boosting immunity in children should help protect them and reduce the risk of the virus continuing to spread.

Will my child be offered a vaccine?   How do I find out more?

If your child is eligible for an extra dose, we will contact you to ask you to book an appointment for the vaccine.

Find out more about the polio booster campaign on GOV.UK.

Useful leaflets:

 

Detailed Q&A

What is polio?

Polio is an infection caused by a virus that attacks the nervous system – it can cause permanent paralysis of muscles. Before the polio vaccine was introduced, there were as many as 8,000 cases of polio in the UK in epidemic years. Because of the success of the polio vaccination programme, there have been no cases of natural polio infection in the UK for over 30 years (the last case was in 1984) and polio was eradicated from the whole of Europe in 2003

Why is polio back in the news?

Polio is not back in England. There have been no clinical cases of wild polio in England. The last case of wild polio in the UK was in 1984 and the UK was declared polio-free by the WHO in 2003.

Since February 2022 traces of type 2 poliovirus have been detected in sewage samples in North and East London. It has been detected in sewage in Barnet, Brent, Camden, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey, Islington and Waltham Forest.

As part of routine surveillance, it is normal for 1 to 3 ‘vaccine-like’ polioviruses to be detected each year in UK sewage samples when an individual vaccinated overseas with the live oral polio vaccine (OPV) returned or travelled to the UK and briefly ‘shed’ traces of the vaccine-like poliovirus in their faeces.

However several closely related viruses have been found in sewage samples taken between February and May. The level of poliovirus found and the high genetic diversity among the PV2 isolates suggests that there is some level of virus transmission in these boroughs which may extend to the adjacent areas. This suggests that transmission has gone beyond a close network of a few individuals.

The virus has continued to evolve and is now classified as a ‘vaccine-derived’ poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2), which on rare occasions can cause serious illness, such as paralysis, in people who are not fully vaccinated.

The polio virus found in London should not pose any risk to those who are fully vaccinated. However, whilst it is spreading, there is a small chance that those who have not been fully vaccinated, or those who cannot respond well to vaccines, could be at risk of catching polio.

The good news is that we have picked this virus up early and we want to act now to protect as many people as we can. It is important that children are vaccinated against polio so they are protected and to reduce the risk of the virus continuing to spread. Please come forward as soon as your child is invited.

How concerned should I be about polio?

The risk to the population is extremely low. The majority of the UK population has already been immunised against polio. The polio virus found in London should not pose any risk to those who are fully vaccinated, which most Londoners are. However, whilst it is spreading, there is a small chance that those who have not been fully vaccinated, such as young children who are only part way through their polio vaccination schedule or those who have missed their routine vaccinations could be at risk of catching polio and getting ill.  UKHSA have confirmed that the overall risk is still very low and the NHS is ensuring that all children in London aged 1-9 are offered a polio vaccine, either to catch up where a routine vaccine has been missed or an additional dose for those that are up to date.

What are the symptoms of polio?

Most people with polio won’t have any symptoms and will fight off the infection without even realising they were infected. A small number of people will experience a flu-like illness 3 to 21 days after they’re infected.

Symptoms can include:

  • a high temperature (fever) of 38C (100.4F) or above
  • a sore throat
  • a headache
  • abdominal (tummy) pain
  • aching muscles
  • feeling and being sick

 

These symptoms will usually pass within about a week without any medical intervention.

In a small number of cases, between 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000 infections, infection can cause paralysis, usually in the legs, that develops over hours or days. If the breathing muscles are affected, it can be life threatening. Symptoms include rapid onset of weakness in a limb which will be flaccid (or floppy). The weakness most often involves the legs, but sometimes affects the muscles of the head and neck or breathing.

What should you do if you experience any polio symptoms?

If you or your child are experiencing symptoms of polio then we advise you to ask for an urgent GP appointment.

What should people do to protect themselves against polio if they live in London?

In London, all children aged 1-9 years need to have a dose of polio vaccine now – whether it’s an extra booster dose if they are up to date with their routine vaccinations or a catch up dose.

GPs in London will contact parents when it’s their child’s turn to come forward for a booster or catch-up polio dose.

I’m a clinically vulnerable/elderly adult – what’s my risk?  Why am I not being offered an extra booster?

The risk to the population is extremely low as the majority of the UK population has already been immunised against polio. If you are up to date with your routine immunisations, you will be protected against polio and your risk of getting ill from polio will be low. The reason children are being offered a booster dose in London is because this is where poliovirus has been detected and between ages 1-9 they have not received their full course of polio vaccinations and so are only partially protected. If you are not up to date with your routine immunisations you can catch up for free on the NHS at any time.

When would my child have been vaccinated against polio?

The polio vaccine is free and given as part of combined jabs to babies, toddlers and teenagers. Children need all five doses of the vaccine to be fully protected against polio. The polio vaccine is given when a child is:

  • 8, 12 and 16 weeks old as part of the 6-in-1 vaccine (DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB)
  • 3 years and 4 months old as part of the 4-in-1 (DTaP/IPV) pre-school booster
  • 14 years old as part of the 3-in-1 (Td/IPV) teenage booster

What do I do if myself or my child have not been vaccinated against polio?

The booster programme is part of the incident response and is available to everyone in London, however routine polio vaccination is available to everyone in England. It is never too late to catch up for free on the NHS at any time. People should also get vaccinated even if they’ve had polio before as the vaccine protects against three different types of poliovirus. In London, the NHS will contact you when it is your turn to come forwards.

What is being offered to children aged 1 to 9 in London?

In London, all children aged 1-9 years are being offered a dose of polio vaccine – whether it’s an extra dose if they are up to date with their routine vaccinations or to catch up. This is part of the incident response to ensure a high level of protection from paralysis and to help stop the virus spreading further. The booster dose will be offered to children in the areas where type 2 poliovirus has been detected in wastewater first and then offered to all London boroughs.

Why are children that are up to date with their routine vaccinations being offered an additional dose in London? Are all 1-9 year olds being offered a polio booster?

Experts have advised that, as a precaution, all children aged one to nine years in London should be offered a dose of polio vaccine now to ensure that they are protected against polio and to stop any further spread of poliovirus in London.  This is because children in this age range have not received the full programme of vaccination so they are not yet fully protected against polio. By getting a dose now this will boost their protection against polio. In London, all children aged 1-9 years are being offered a dose of polio vaccine. This will either be a top up dose in children that are fully up to date with their routine vaccinations or a catch up dose.

Is this an extra jab? Will children that need to catch up with their missed routine vaccination/s then get an additional dose on top of that?  

We need to protect children against polio now. Bringing a child up to date now will achieve the same effect as the offer of an additional booster – so those who are brought up to date don’t need an extra dose further down the line.

For children that are fully up to date with their routine vaccinations, this will be an additional polio vaccine to enhance their protection against polio whilst it is being detected in wastewater samples. If your child is not up to date with their routine vaccinations they will be given a catch up dose so it will not be an additional dose.

Is there anyone who cannot have a polio vaccine?

There are very few reasons why children cannot receive the polio vaccine. If your child had a serious allergic reaction to a previous vaccination or to certain uncommon antibiotics (neomycin, polymyxin or streptomycin) you may want to check with your doctor.

Is there anyone who does not need to get a polio dose now?

The only small group of children in London who don’t need a dose now are those who had a pre-school booster (at 3yrs 4m) in the last 12 months, but if they get an extra booster in error it won’t cause any harm.

If you are not in London, your child will not proactively be offered a booster dose, however you can contact your GP to check if you, or your child, are up to date with your polio vaccinations. For children and babies, you can also check their personal child health record (red book). It is never too late to catch up and you can catch up for free on the NHS at any time by booking an appointment with your GP surgery.

Will my child still need their regular dose at 3yrs 4 months if they received the booster?

Even after your child receives an extra dose, you need to complete the routine doses at the recommended age. Check with your GP surgery.

If my child is up to date with their routine vaccinations and due to get their pre-school booster will they be offered a dose of polio vaccine?

It is important that children aged 1 to 9 years in London get vaccinated against polio now. When you are contacted by your GP you should come forwards to ensure that your child is protected and they will advise on what vaccine you child receives.

Why can’t my child just wait for their regularly timed vaccine?

Getting a dose of polio vaccine now will immediately boost you child’s protection against polio. This will ensure that they are protected against polio and to stop any further spread of poliovirus in London.  Children in this age range have not received the full programme of vaccination so they are not yet fully protected against polio.

If no cases of polio have been reported, what is the need to get a polio vaccine?

This response has been advised by experts on the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) who also advised on the COVID-19 response. The suggestion for all children aged one to nine to get a dose of polio vaccine now has been advised as a precaution to ensure that they are protected, particularly in the areas where type 2 poliovirus has been detected in sewage samples. Children in this age range have not received the full programme of vaccination so they are not yet fully protected against polio. By getting a dose now this will boost their protection against polio. It will also help to stop any further spread of poliovirus in London.

How can my child get the polio booster?

Your GP will contact you to ask you to book an appointment.

Where do I get my child’s vaccine?

Your child can get their catch up dose of polio vaccine or routine vaccinations at their GP surgery. For the booster campaign, additional vaccination providers are being agreed on a borough by borough basis and this information will be shared soon.

Can I get the vaccination anywhere apart from my GP surgery?

The NHS will let you know when you can book your appointment. Additional vaccination providers are being agreed on a borough by borough basis and this information will be shared soon.

What should I do if I am not registered with a GP?

Anyone in England can register with a GP surgery. It’s free to register. You do not need proof of address or immigration status, ID or an NHS number. You can find a GP online and can either register online or call or email the GP surgery and ask to be registered as a patient. Once you are registered the NHS will let you know when you can book your polio appointment. For the booster campaign, additional vaccination providers are being agreed on a borough by borough basis and this information will be shared soon.

Are all the polio vaccine doses the same? What exactly is in the booster dose?

All polio vaccines are already used in the routine programme and safely given to millions of children each year.. You can read the Infanrix Hexa or Vaxelis product information leaflets (PIL), the Boostrix-IPV PIL or the Revaxis PIL for more details on your vaccine

What are the side effects of the vaccine?

Your child may have some redness, swelling or tenderness in the arm where they had the injection, this will usually disappear in a few days. A hard lump may appear in the same place but this will also resolve on its own, usually over a few weeks. Occasionally, children may be unwell and irritable and develop a temperature and a headache.

Will additional doses on top of the routine vaccinations be rolled out to other areas of the country or other age groups?

There are currently no plans to.  Poliovirus has only been detected in North and East London so far. If you are not in London, whilst your child will not proactively be offered a booster dose, you can contact your GP to check if you, or your child, are up to date with your polio vaccinations. For children and babies, you can also check their personal child health record (red book). It is never too late to catch up and you can catch up for free on the NHS at any time by booking an appointment with your GP surgery.

Is it safe for my child to have so many vaccines – won’t they all overload their system?

Studies have shown there are no harmful effects from having several vaccines at the same time. This also means babies are protected from a wider range of infections from an earlier age and will require fewer trips to the doctor.

Has polio been detected outside of London?

Type 2 poliovirus has so far only been detected in North and East London. The UKHSA, working with the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), has enhanced the sewage surveillance to assess the extent of spread of the virus. They plan to stand up 10 -15 sites nationally to determine if poliovirus is spreading outside of London.

Is what we are seeing in London linked to cases of polio seen in Israel and New York?

UKHSA are working closely with health agencies in New York and Israel alongside the WHO to investigate the possible links between the poliovirus detected in London and recent polio incidents in these two other countries.

What should people do to protect themselves against polio if they live outside of London?

The best way to prevent polio is to make sure you and your child are up to date with your vaccinations. If you are not in London, whilst your child will not proactively be offered a booster dose, you can contact your GP to check if you, or your child, are up to date with your polio vaccinations. For children and babies, you can also check their personal child health record (red book). It is never too late to catch up and you can catch up for free on the NHS at any time by booking an appointment with your GP surgery.

The Practice will close at 12.30pm on 12.7.22 for staff training

The Practice will close at 12.30pm on 12.7.2022 for staff training and it will reopen on 13.07.2022 at 8.00am.

For any URGENT reasons which cannot wait while we will be closed for training please call 020 8175 0143, and you will speak to a GP who will assess your problem and arrange appropriate care. For any non-urgent problems please visit our practice website and click on the online consultation link where your query will be dealt with when the practice re-opens.

In a medical emergency, please telephone 999 or for advice, telephone 111

If you have a prearranged appointment at The Well Centre, please enter the lobby and call the intercom for one of their staff members.

Thank you.

Herne Hill Group Practice

Covid control measure changes – 27.6.22

Thank you to all patients for adhering to our covid rules.

We can now gladly say that masks are no longer required when entering the surgery unless you are experiencing any respiratory symptoms (coughing, sneezing).

Our main practice door will now be open so no need to use the intercom to enter.

We can also gladly announce our self service screen is back in use for patients arriving themselves.

Clinicians and nurses will still be following all covid guidelines where applicable.

We would like to send a big thankyou for your patience and understanding during this time.

Mental Health Week 2022 – 9-15th May

Fancy a cuppa? Sometimes reaching out to someone with as little as three words can make a big difference.

 

This Mental Health Awareness Week, the theme is loneliness – something we all can experience at some point in our lives, which can have a huge impact on our wellbeing.

 

Sometimes it can be easier to reach out to someone else who may be feeling lonely. As part of the Better Health: Every Mind Matters campaign the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport alongside the Department for Health and Social Care are continuing to encourage people to ‘Lift Someone Out of Loneliness’ by taking a simple action to help someone who may be feeling lonely. If we do this regularly, we can all help to lift each other up.

 

Find out how you can help to lift someone out of loneliness.